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If I Were Mo

Posted by Steve Griffith

The offseason to a general manager is like September is to a player on a team 8.5 games out of the Wild Card. The chaos begins the day the World Series ends. Which players might the team lose to free agency? Which players do we try to retain the services of for the next season? Which players are we willing to deal if the right trade presents itself?

For John Mozeliak, the regular season is fun and exciting, but I can bet you that night after night of the postseason are sleepless for him. I don’t want to dive into the drama that is the Albert Pujols free agency. Rather, I’d like to analyze some possible free agent pick ups and trades that could keep the defending World Champions fighting for another ring in 2012.

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Progressive Game Blog: Fifth Inning

Posted by JE Powell

The top of the fifth inning was pretty uneventful as Kyle Lohse was able to put the Brewers down 1-2-3.  The first batter was Rickie Weeks who flew out to Lance Berkman in right field. Second up was Craig Counsell and a little ground ball to Albert Puujols for the out numero dos. The last batter Lohse faced in the inning was Ryan Braun, he of the recent contract extension that keeps him a Brewer through 2020. Braun fouled out near the tarp to Pujols who make a basket catch for the third and final out of the top half of the inning.

Yovani Gallardo started the game for the Brewers and was still pitching, and quite well, in the fifith inning. The first to bat of the inning for the Cardinals was Matt Holliday who struck out swinging.

Berkman was up second and walked after working the count full. It was a pretty good at bat for the Big Puma who not only worked the count full, but also fouled several balls off. I really like to see this from batters because if every batter can cause the pitcher to throw six to seven pitches per at bat, the pitcher is nearing 100 pitches by the fifth or sixth innings. Even if it results in an out, I still like to see Cardinals at bats where the batter forces the pitcher to throw at least six to seven pitches. This one, as I said, resulted in a Berkman walk, so all the better.

Yadier Molina was the third batter of the inning and came up to bat with one out and one on. He made contact with a one and one count, but didn’t hit the ball very hard. In fact, the ball went off of Brewers’ pitcher Gallardo’s glove and kept the ball from being a double play ball. So, if nothing else, Molina advanced Berkman over to second.

Daniel Descalso was the fourth Cardinals batter to come to the plate in the fifht inning. Descalso’s at bat was very similar to Berkman’s in the inning. Descalso worked the count full after fouling off a couple of pitches, and then walked. Another very good at bat in the inning.

The fifth, and final, Cardinals batter of the inning was Tyler Greene who came to bat with two on and two out. Greene made good contact on only the second pitch he saw,  and it to just shy of the warning track, but Mark Kotsay made a nice hopping (skipping? definitely not leaping) catch to take away a hit. The ball gets over his head and Greene probably would have been looking a two RBI triple. Despite the fact that it resulted in an out, it was a decent at bat for Greene and if not for a good play, could have been a great at bat.

The Cards had a runner in scoring position and two on at one point in the inning, but failed to get anyone home. This game, I think, was an example of Gallardo pitching very well, rather than the Cardinals just not hitting. The Cards have a very good hitting  lineup and rarely hit that poorly, therefore, Gallardo pitched great. He didn’t necessarily pitch great in the fifth, allowing two walks, but he pitched well enough to get out of the inning without allowing a hit or a run to score.